Pharmaceutical Medicine – a Form of Human Sacrifice

Wow Check Out this Article on GreenMedInfo.com titled:

Has Drug-Driven Medicine Become A Form of Human Sacrifice?

23 And the light of a candle shall shine no more at all in thee; and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee: for thy merchants were the great men of the earth; for by thy sorceries were all nations deceived.

24 And in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth.

pharmakeia: the use of medicine, drugs or spells

Original Word: φαρμακεία, ας, ἡ
Part of Speech: Noun, Feminine
Transliteration: pharmakeia
Phonetic Spelling: (far-mak-i’-ah)
Definition: the use of medicine, drugs or spells
Usage: magic, sorcery, enchantment.

HELPS Word-studies

5331 pharmakeía (from pharmakeuō, “administer drugs”) – properly, drug-related sorcery, like the practice of magical-arts, etc. (A. T. Robertson).

Pharmageddon: The Death of Natural Medicine

What is so remarkable about the present state of affairs, is that it may have been predicted long ago, as evidenced by this passage in Revelations:

“At the end of times the merchants of the world will deceive the nations through their Pharmacia.”
(sorcery) – Rev 18:23

Pharmaceuticals and Human Sacrifice

The sole reliance on Pharmaceuticals reveals quite a lot about the largely subconscious agenda underpinning modern medical practice.  The Greek word Pharmakon has a wide range of meanings, with “drug” being the most widely recognized one.  But the root of this word usage goes back much farther:

“A Pharmakós (Greek: φαρμακός) in Ancient Greek religion was a kind of human scapegoat (a slave, a cripple or a criminal) who was chosen and expelled from the community at times of disaster (famine, invasion or plague) or at times of calendrical crisis, when purification was needed.” [Source]

The sacrificial dimension of the Pharmakós carries on in the nostrums and potions later named after this ritualistic object:

“The term “pharmakos” later became the term “pharmakeus” which refers to “a drug, spell-giving potion, druggist, poisoner, by extension a magician or a sorcerer.”A variation of this term is “pharmakon” (φάρμακον) a complex term meaning sacrament, remedy, poison, talisman, cosmetic, perfume or intoxicant.”From this, the modern term “pharmacology” emerged,” [Source]

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